HS Chemistry

DONE!( Almost.)  Aside from some of the labs near the end of the course and a “living books” assignment yet to be wiggled into the schedule, this syllabus is complete. If you want to follow us in real-time, visit us at Let’s Not Burn Down the House. The pace may not match the pace here perfectly, as real life rarely imitates even the best-planned syllabus, but we try. All labs should be here soon. Tests will be added as we go. “This We Know” will only be available on the above website.

This is a high-school level chemistry class, honors level, designed for students who are comfortable with Algebra I and taking Algebra II. It is NOT an AP-level course and isn’t designed with the SAT Chemistry subject test in mind. My aim is for my students to understand essential chemistry topics and better appreciate the role of chemistry in their lives and the world.

All classes have readings, websites, assigned problems, and topics. Labs are yet to come. I’ll be using Thompson’s Chemistry: All Lab, No Lecture for some of the labs, while others will come from sources to be named over the next few weeks. Links to the tests will be up as the semester goes along. No, the tests don’t have answer keys, as I’ve not figured out how to manage access only to instructors and not students.

Last time, I relied on it being the International Year of Chemistry to supply writing assignments, as their essay contests were a fine way to encourage kids to write. This year, I’ll be looking for other ways to add writing into the course. I’d also like them to read at least one “living chemistry” book during the year, and I’d like them delving into chemistry in the news. Unfortunately, they all seem to have other classes, too, so I’ll have to rein in my enthusiasm.

I stop short in the text, omitting the last third of Chapter 19 on organic chem and all of Chapter 20 on biochem. My biology students have had some of the biochem, although on a simpler level, and they’ll see both again. The focus of the organic is on naming compounds, which is memorization-heavy and not my favorite way to teach. I’m considering ditching chapter 19 entirely in order to spend longer on radioactivity, possibly using Physics for Future Presidents. That’s information they’ll need in their lives.

Bring to every class:

  • Textbook (Zumdahl’s Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation, 5th edition.  ISBN 0-618-30499-1)
  • Lab book (Thompson’s Illustrated Guide to Home Chemistry Experiments: All Lab, No Lecture)
  • Lab notebook
  • Notebook for class notes
  • Folder for lab reports, etc.
  • All homework
  • Lab coat (may keep at the lab)
  • Safety goggles (may keep at the lab)

Support Materials

  • Instructor’s Annotated Edition of Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation, 5th edition, Zumdahl, ISBN 0-618-30507-6
  • General Chemistry: The Essential Concepts, Chang. Any edition will do. This is helpful when looking for different wording for an explanation. I’ve also used it for test questions.
  • Solutions Guide for Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation, 5th edition, Zumdahl. ISBN 978-0-618-30530-8.  This has worked answers to the even questions, and I generally build my tests from those.

Week 1 (Work to be completed before our first meeting. Please contact me if you have questions. The more of this we have down from the start, the more quickly we can move into chemistry.)

Readings:

  • Zumdahl (textbook): Chapters 1 and 2.
  • Thompson (lab book): Chapters 1 – 5, with the goal of being familiar with safety, equipment, and chemical use. We’ll need this information throughout the course, so it’s best to be ready.
  • Read 6.1 in your lab book so you are ready to discuss labs and lab reports.

Websites: 

Assignments: 

  • Zumdahl problems (Chapter 2): 13, 14, 38, 53, 70, 96, 103, 106, 110, 113,  115, 116, 140, 144, 152, 156.  For ALL problems, show your work. ALL math/equations should be written by hand for this assignment and all others. Other work may be typed or handwritten.
  • Let’s Check Up on Your Math worksheet (Greatneck Schools) — This is a SHORT check on your algebra skills and sense of scientific notation.
  • Always read thoroughly and carefully. Take notes if that helps you understand the material (and that helps for many learners).  Watch all videos and read all links. If you need more assistance understanding, use Google, your textbook, and the links on the website. This is the ONLY time this reminder will appear in assignments!

Class: 

  • General course introduction
  • Discussion of homework problems from chapter 2
  • Lab introduction and practice with equipment
  • Discuss lab report and prelab expectations (Prelab work for non-inquiry labs always includes reading the lab through and completing the materials and procedure portions of the lab, putting the procedure into their own words and making it briefer than the directions in the book. Prelab preparation also means anticipating data collection, which may necessitate sketching out a spot for a chart in the notebook.)

Topics: Quantitative vs qualitative, significant figures, accurate vs. precise, dimensional analysis, scientific notation, temperature conversion, density, density equations

Week 2

Readings:

  • Zumdahl: Chapter 3.1- 3.5
  • Thompson: Lab 6.1 –  Separate Sand and Sucrose

Websites:

Assignments: 

  • Chapter 2 Problems: (more assigned as needed based on struggles with the first set of problems)
  • Prelab for Lab 6.1: Separate sand and sucrose (Prelab includes introduction, hypothesis or purpose, and procedure.) Bring a printed copy of this. If you’re anticipating data that might fit on a table, design the table before you come.

Class:

  • Discuss problems from Chapter 2
  • Notes
  • Lab 6.1 — Separate Sand and Sucrose

Topics: Matter, physical and chemical properties, physical and chemical changes, elements, compounds, mixtures, pure substances, homogenous mixtures, heterogeneous mixtures, solutions, distillation, filtration,

Week 3

Readings:

  • Zumdahl: Chapter 3.6 – 3.7
  • Thompson: Lab 6.2 -Distillation

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Discuss chapter 3 Problems: 9, 18, 19, 25, 27, 28, 35, 36
  • Final lab report for 6.1
  • NO prelab for 6.2

Class:

  • Problems from Chapter 3
  • Notes on second portion of Chapter 3
  • Lab 6.2 – Distillation
  • Hands-On — 2.4.4 Distillation

Topics: heat, energy, temperature, exothermic reaction, endothermic reaction, calorie, joule, specific heat, specific heat capacity

 Week 4

Readings:

  • Zumdahl: Chapter 4 — There’s a lot to this chapter, and we cover it in only one week. Take your time. Read it twice. Take notes on it.
  • Thompson: Lab 6.3 — Recrystallization

Websites: The Bozeman and Crash Course lectures contain the same material. Watch the videos from both, or watch the series that works best for you.

Assignments:

  • Chapter 3 Problems: 38, 39, 44, 50, 52, 54, 56, 64, 66, 72, 75. Show all your work. Use proper significant figures and scientific notation.
  • Prelab for Lab 6.3
  • Questions for distillation labs (Hands-On pg 159 for all labs done. Lab questions from 6.2 if lab is done fully.)

Class:

  • Discuss chapter 3 Problems
  • Notes on Chapter 4
  • Lab 6.3 — Recrystallization (skip synthesizing copper carbonate if out of time)

Topics:  elements, Dalton’s atomic theory, Law of constant composition, chemical formula, Rutherford, proton, neutron, electron, periodic table organization, alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, halogens, noble gases, transition metals, nonmetals, metalloids, ions, cations and anions, ionic compounds.

 

 Week 5

Readings:

  • Zumdahl: Chapter 5  — You will have some charts of ions when you problem-solve and take tests, so don’t sweat the memorization of the ions. Do understand the rules, however.
  • (Chromatography)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Chapter 4 Problems: 15, 16, 25, 38, 40, 44, 45, 58, 66, 77, 83, 89
  • Final Lab Report for lab 6.3

Class:

  • Discuss chapter 4 problems
  • Notes
  • Lab — Chromotography

Topics: binary compounds, binary ionic compounds (Type I and II), Type III binary compounds, naming acids, oxyanion

 Week 6

Readings:

  • Zumdahl: Review Chapters 1 – 5
  • No lab prep. Demo week!

Websites: 

  • No new websites. Reviewing previous links will help you with the test.

Assignments:

  • Chapter 5 problems: 9, 22, 37, 40, 49, 67 – 74, 89
  • Start to study for Test I covering chapters 1 -5 and the labs we’ve done this far. See This We Know for a list of topics. Study your notes, the text, and your homework.

Class:

  • Discuss chapter 5 problems.
  • Brief test review
  • Reaction demos

Topics: review

 Week 7

Readings:

  • Zumdahl: Chapter 8 — Chemical Composition (We’ll return to 6 and 7 later.)
  • Thompson: Read Chapter 7 (pages 121-125) and 7.1.

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Take Chemistry Test 1 and bring it to class.
  • NO prelab for 7.1, but have read the lab carefully and summarize the steps

Class:

  • Notes on Chapter 8
  • Lab 7.1

Topics: atomic mass unit, mole, molar mass, Avogadro’s number, average atomic mass, mass percent, empirical and molecular formulae

 Week 8  — NATIONAL MOLE DAY (October 23, 2014 , 6:02 am to 6:02 pm)

Readings: 

  • Zumdahl: Chapter 6 — Chemical Reactions
  • Thompson: Lab 7.3 — read

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Chapter 8 Problems: 8, 14, 20 (a,b,f), 24 (a,d,f), 28 (a,b,c), 38, 52, 56, 62, 74 80, 82
  • Questions from 7.1
  • Summarize steps of Lab 7.3

Class:

  • Review Chapter 8 problems.
  • Notes on Chapter 6
  • Balancing practice
  • Lab 7.3

Topics: chemical reaction, chemical equation, reactant, product, coefficient, balancing chemical equations

 Week 9

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 7.1 – 7.3: Reactions in Aqueous Solutions
  • Thompson: Read lab 9.1 (Observe a Composition Reaction)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Chapter 6 Problems: 35, 48, 49, 57, 60, 61, 67, 75
  • Prelab 9.1

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 6
  • Notes on first half of chapter 7
  • Lab 9.1 — Observe a Composition Reaction –THIS LAB NEEDS TO BE DONE OUTSIDE!

Topics: precipitation reaction, electrolyte, solubility rules, soluble and insoluble solids, precipitates, ionic equations and molecular equations, spectator ions. 

 Week 10

Readings:

  • Zumdahl: Chapter  7.4- 7.6
  • Thompson: Read Lab 9.2 (Observe a decomposition reaction)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Find a question for research —  with works cited. Wikipedia is NOT a source. Due Week 12
    • How was the mole discovered?
    • What is the difference between corrosive and caustic? Give examples of both in either the lab or in nature.
    • Anything else that comes to mind.
  • Prelab 9.2
  • Final lab report for 9.1

Class:

  • Notes for Chapter 7
  • Lab 9.2
  • Discuss research questions

Topics: acids and bases, salts, oxidation-reduction reaction, double-displacement reaction, acid-base reactions

 Week 11

Readings: 

  • Zumdahl: Chapter 9.1 – 9.3 — Chemical Quantities
  • Thompson: Read Lab 9.3 (Single Displacement)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Chapter 8 Problems: 8, 14, 20 (a,b,f), 24 (a,d,f), 28 (a,b,c), 38, 52, 56, 62, 74 80, 82
  • Continue work on your question, which is due Week 12
  • Prelab 9.3
  • Final lab report 9.2

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 8
  • Notes on first half of chapter 9
  • Lab 9.3 (Single Displacement)

Topics: mole ratios, mass calculations

 Week 12

Readings:

  • Zumdahl: Chapter 9.4 – 9.5 — Chemical Quantities
  • Thompson: Read 9.4 (Double Displacement)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Assigned question due at the start of class
  • Chapter 9 Questions and Problems: 1,2,3,4,5 7, 11, 15
  • Prelab 9.4
  • Final lab report 9.3

Class:

  • Share information from writing assignment
  • Notes on the second half of chapter 9
  • Lab 9.4 (Double displacement)

Topics: limiting reactant, theoretical yield, percent yield

 Week 13

Readings:

  • Zumdahl: Reread Chapter 9.
  • Thompson: Lab 10.1 (Reduction of Copper Ore to Copper Metal)

Websites: 

  • Review previous websites on stoichiometry as needed. Kahn Academy may be especially helpful if you’re having difficulty.

Assignments:

  • Chapter 9 Questions and Problems: 19 (a, c, f, g), 21 (a, b, c), 30, 32, 38, 42, 45 (a, b), 49 (a, b), 54, 60, 64
  • Prelab 10.1
  • Final lab report 9.4
  • Start to study for test 2, covering chapters 6 -9

Class:

  • We’ll review the problems from the assignment last week, and we’ll work more problems as needed.
  • Lab 10.1 (Copper Ore to Copper Metal)

Topics: all previous stoichiometry-related material 

 Week 14

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 10.1 -10.6  — Modern Atomic Theory
  • Thompson: Read 10.2 (Observe the Oxidation States of Manganese)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Chapter 9 Additional Problems: 67, 71, 77, 80, 81, 86, 92
  • Continue to study for Test 2. The cumulative reviews at the end of every other chapter will be helpful.
  • Prelab 10.2
  • Final lab report 10.1

Class:

  • Review problems and answer any questions about material for the test.
  • Notes on Chapter 10
  • Lab 10.2 (Observe the Oxidation States of Manganese)

Topics: Rutherford, electromagnetic radiation, waves, frequency, photons, quanta, Bohr model, wave mechanical model

 Week 15

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 10.6 – end– Modern Atomic Theory
  • Read Gummy Bear Lab (source pending)

Websites:

Assignments:

  • Take Test 2 when you’re ready. Remember to show all your work. All problems must be solved on paper with a pen or pencil — no equations worked via computer, please.
  • Final lab report 10.2

Class:

  • Submit Test 2 at the start of class
  • Notes on Chapter 10
  • Problems from chapter 10
  • Gummy Bear Lab, observed and outside

Topics: orbitals, energy levels, Pauli exclusion principle, electron configurations, orbital diagrams, lanthanide and actinide series, metals, metalloids, nonmetals, ionization energy, atomic size

 Week 16

Readings: 

  • Zumdahl Chapter 11.1 – 11.7 (Chemical Bonding)
  • Thompson: Read lab 12.1 and 12.2 (Determine the Effect of Temperature on Reaction Rate)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Chapter 10 Problems:  4,8,16, 22, 28, 30, 28, 44, 48, 50,54, 58, 60, 68, 70, 78
  • Prelab 12.1 ONLY

Class:

  • Review problems from chapter 10
  • Notes on Chapter 11
  • Review Test 2
  • Lab 12.1 (possibly 12.2)

Topics: ionic bonding, covalent bonding, polar covalent bonding, electronegativity, dipole moments, electron configurations, Lewis structures,

 Week 17

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 11.7-end
  • Thompson: Read lab 12.3 (Observe the Effect of Concentration on Reaction Rate)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Start working on your element essay (due Week 20): Pick an element that you think is very important to life, our current world, or the future.  Make your thesis a statement that reflects why you think that.  Support your statement in AT LEAST three other paragraphs (at least five total — intro, 3 body, 1 conclusion).  Include basic information about your element:  atomic number, atomic mass, location on table, oxidation states, family, discovery date (how and who, briefly), where it is found.  Include what current or future use of the element is or could be.  Back up your writing with a good bibliography.  NO WIKIPEDIA!  Use at least one actual book (these still exist).  BEFORE you start writing, present your idea to me for approval. No duplicates, so first-come, first-serve (or first-write) on the elements
  • Problems from Chapter 11:  1, 3, 4, 9, 14, 20, 22, 28, 38, 40, 41, 48
  • Prelab 12.3
  • Final lab report 12.1

Class:

  • Chapter 11 problems reviewed
  • Notes on the rest of chapter 11
  • Plenty of practice with Lewis dot diagrams
  • Lab 12.3

Topics: Lewis structures (again), resonance, single/double/triple bonds, octet rule, bond angles, linear/trigonal planar/tetrahedral structure, VSEPR

 Week 18

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 12.1- 12.5 (Gases)
  • Thompson: Read lab 14.1 (Boyle’s Law)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 11:  56, 58, 62, 68, 71, 72, 73, 77, 84, 86, 88, 110
  • Continue work on your essay. Rough draft is due Week 19
  • Prelab 14.1
  • Final lab report 12.3

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 11 (second half)
  • Notes on Chapter 12
  • Lab 14.1 (Boyle’s Law)

Topics: measuring pressure, torr, standard atmospheric pressure, pascal, Boyle’s Law, Charles’s Law, absolute zero, Avogadro’s Law, ideal gas law, ideal gas, universal gas constant

Week 19

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 12.6 -end
  • Thompson: Read lab 14.2 (Charles’ Law) — NEED DRY ICE!

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 12: 7 (a,b), 9 (a,b), 11 (a,b), 14, 15, 22,24, 26, 29, 33, 36, 42, 44
  • Submit your rough draft to me electronically by TUESDAY. I’ll have feedback for you by class on Thursday. Final paper is due on paper with correct citations at the start of class, Week 20.
  • Prelab  14.2
  • Final lab report 14.1

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 12 (first half of chapter)
  • Notes on Chapter 12 (second half)
  • Lab 14.2 (Charles’ Law)

Topics: Dalton’s law of partial pressures, temperature and pressure relationship, kinetic molecular theory, STP

 

Week 20

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 13
  • Thompson: Read Lab 14.3 (Gay-Lussac’s Law)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 12: 50, 54, 58, 62, 65, 68, 74, 75, 81, 83, 86, 90, 98, 100
  • Prelab 14.3
  • Final lab report 14.2
  • Start to study for Test 3, covering chapters 10 – 13, which is due Week 22

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 12
  • Notes on Chapter 13
  • Lab 14.3 (Gay-Lussac’s Law)

Topics: properties of water, normal boiling point, phase change, heating and cooling curves, intramolecular and intermolecular forces, heat of fusion, heat of vaporization, hydrogen bonding, London dispersion forces, condensation, vapor pressure, crystalline solids (ionic, molecular, and atomic), alloys

 

Week 21

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 14.1-14.5 — Solutions
  • Thompson: Read lab 15.1 (Heat of Solution)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 13: 6, 9,12, 15, 18, 23, 26, 30, 33, 36, 40, 42 (don’t try this at home), 46, 49
  • Prelab 15.1
  • Full lab report for 13.3
  • Study for Test 3, covering chapters 10-13 (due Week 22)

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 13
  • Any other review for the test that you need
  • Notes on Chapter 14 (first half)
  • Lab 15.1

Topics: solution, solutes, solvent, aqueous solutions, saturation, concentrated vs dilute, solution composition (mass percent and molarity), dilution

 

Week 22

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 14.6-end
  • Thompson: Read lab 15.2 (Heat of fusion of ice)

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Prelab 15.2
  • Final lab report 15.1 — MAY SUBMIT WEEK 23, given test and problems
  • TEST 3 (Chapters 10-13)
  • Problems for Chapter 14: 3, 5 ,6 ,9, 18, 21, 28, 38, 44, 50 (A,B)

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 14
  • Notes on Chapter
  • Lab 15.2

Topics: Stoichiometry of solution reactions, neutralization reactions, equivalent weights,

 

Week 23

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 15 — Acids and Bases
  • Thompson: Read lab 15.3 (Determine the Specific Heat of  a Metal)

Websites: 

  • pH and pOH (Crash Course Chemistry #30)
  • Buffers, the Acid Rain Slayer (Crash Course Chemistry #31)
  • Logarithms (Khanacademy) — You need a basic understanding of logarithms to understand pH. Watch the first video, do the problems in the second section, watch the third video, and do the problems that follow.

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 14: 58, 61, 63, 68, 74, 75, 77, 80, 84
  • Prelab 15.1
  • Final lab report 15.1 (if not turned in the previous week) and 15.2

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 14
  • Notes on Chapter 15
  • Lab 15. (Specific Heat of a Metal)

Topics: acids, bases, Arrhenius concept of acids and bases, Bronsted-Lowry model, conjugate acids and bases, hydronium ion, ionized/dissociated, strong acid, weak acid, oxyacids, organic acids, carboxyl group, neutral, pH scale, buffers

 

Week 24   NEED LABS AFTER THIS POINT

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 15 — reread as needed. Work through the sample problems if you need more assistance.
  • Thompson

Websites: 

  • Kahn Academy — Any lectures from his Acid and Bases Series may be helpful

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 15:  2, 3, 5, 7, 15, 17, 21, 26, 27, 28, 31, 35
  • Prelab
  • Lab

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 15, first half
  • More notes on Chapter 15 and plenty of problem solving
  • Lab

Topics: See week 23

 

Week 25

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 16.1 – 16.5:  Equilibrium
  • Thompson

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 15: 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 55, 56,57, 63
  • Prelab
  • Lab

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 15, second half
  • Notes on Chapter 16, first half
  • Lab

Topics: collision model, activation energy, catalyst, enzymes, equilibrium, equilibrium expression, equilibrium constant, equilibrium position

 

Week 26

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 16.6 – end  (Reread the first half of the chapter as needed)
  • Thompson

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 16 (first half):  1, 4,5,7,9,11,13,17,20
  • Prelab
  • Lab

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 16 (first half)
  • Notes on Chapter 16, continued, and plenty of problem solving
  • Lab

Topics: heterogeneous and homogeneous equilibria, Le Chatelier’s Principle

 

Week 27

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 17.1 – 17.4: Oxidation-Reduction Reactions and Electrochemistry
  • Thompson

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 16 (second half): 23, 27, 29, 32, 35, 41, 46, 51, 53, 54, 57, 64,6
  • Prelab
  • Lab

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 16 (second half)
  • Notes on Chapter 17
  • Lab

Topics: oxidation-reduction reactions (redox), oxidation states, oxidizing agents, reducing agents, half-reactions

 

Week 28

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 17.5 – end
  • Thompson

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 17 (first half): 7, 8, 15, 19, 29, 35, 37, 43, 46
  • Prelab
  • Lab

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 17 (first half)
  • Notes on Chapter 17
  • Lab

Topics: electrochemistry, batteries, electrochemical battery (galvanic cell), anode, cathode, lead storage battery, electrolysis, potential, dry cell batteries, corrosion

 

Week 29

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 18: Radioactivity and Nuclear Energy
  • Thompson

Websites:

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 17 (second half): 33, 47, 49, 53, 56, 57, 61, 64
  • Prelab
  • Lab

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 17 (second half)
  • Notes on Chapter 18
  • Lab

Topics: radioactive, alpha particle, beta particle, gamma ray, positron, electron capture, nuclear transformation, Geiger counter, half-life, carbon dating

 

Week 30

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 18 (reread if needed)
  • Thompson

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Prelab
  • Lab

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter
  • Notes on Chapter
  • Lab

Topics: fusion, fission, chain reaction, critical mass, breeder reactors, rem

 

Week 31

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 19 .1 – 19.6: Organic Chemistry
  • Thompson

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 18: 13, 19, 21, 27, 28, 29, 33, 42, 44, 52, 54, 58, 68
  • Lab

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 18
  • Notes on Chapter 19 (first five sections)
  • Lab

Topics: double and triple bonds, hydrocarbons, saturated and unsaturated, alkanes, nomenclature, petroleum, natural gas, combustion reactions, substitution reactions, dehydrogenation reactions

 

Week 32

Readings:

  • Zumdahl Chapter 19.6-end
  • Thompson

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 19 (first portion): 1, 3, 9, 11, 13, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 33, 35, 37
  • Prelab
  • Lab

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 19 (first part)
  • Notes on Chapter 19
  • Lab

Topics: alkenes, alkynes, addition reactions, aromatic hydrocarbons, functional groups, alcohols

 

Week 33 — 

Readings:

  • Thompson

Websites: 

Assignments:

  • Problems from Chapter 19 (second part): 39, 40, 45, 47, 49, 53, 55, 56, 58, 61, 63
  • Prelab
  • Lab

Class:

  • Review problems from Chapter 19
  • Review material and catch up, if needed
  • Lab

Topics: No new material. Further discussion of organic chemistry as needed

 

Week 34

Readings: NONE!

Websites: NOPE!

Assignments:

  • Take Test 5 at home and submit it at the start of class
  • Final lab report

Class:

Topics: 

 

 

Old schedule, in part, is below. It will disappear once the labs are in place.

Week 8

Readings: Zumdahl Chapters 7 and 8.
Websites: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnGu3xO2h74 Watch before you do the problems.
Assignments:  Lab write-up for 7.3.  Prep lab 7.5, parts one and two.
Zumdahl problems, Chapter 6:  16, 28, 32, 42, 44, 48, 54, 56, 60, 66, 76

Week 9

Readings:  Nothing new.
Websites:
Assignments:  Lab write-up for 7.5  Prelab for 8.1
Zumdahl Problems, Chapter 7:   8, 12, 16, 20, 22, 28, 30, 34,38, 40
Week 10

Readings:  Review chapter 8 (read again!)
Websites:
Assignments: Lab write-up for 8.1.
Prelab for 8.2
Zumdahl Problems, Chapter 7:  41, 44, 48, 50, 54, 57, 58, 60, 64, 66
Week 11

Readings: Zumdahl, Ch. 9
Assignments:  Lab write-up for 8.2
Prelab 8.3
Zumdahl problems, Chapter 8:  8, 14, 20 (a,b,f), 24 (a, d, f), 28, 32 (a,b,c), 38, 52, 56, 62, 74, 80, 82
Write a paragraph on your topic.  Sources should be provided after your paragraph and may NOT be Wikipedia.  Consider some of the links I list on this site.
S.L.:  How was the mole discovered?
A.M.:  What is the difference between corrosive and caustic?
Week 12

Readings: Review chapter 9 (Zumdahl)

Websites:

Assignments: Lab write-up for 8.3.  Prelab for 9.1
Week 13

Readings: Review the second half of chapter 9.
Assignments: Lab write-up for 9.1
Prelab for 9.2
Zumdahl, Ch 9, Problems 6,8,12, 16,20 (a,c,e,g), 22 (a,c,e,g), 24, 30,36,40
Week 14

Assignments: Lab write-up for 9.2
Pre-lab for lab 9.3 and 9.4
Zumdahl, Ch 9 (second half), Problems 42, 44, 46, 52, 54, 58, 64, 66
Test 2 is coming!  We’ll be moving to new material in 2011.  Check “This We Know” and study.
Week 15

Readings:  Zhumdahl, Chapter 10

Assignments:  Lab write-up for 9.3 and 9.4. Pre-lab 10.1Turn in Test 2

Week 16

Readings: Zumdahl  , Chapter 11

Assignments:  Lab write-up for 10.1
Pre lab for 10.2
Problems, Zhumdahl Ch. 10:  4,8,16, 22, 28, 30, 28, 44, 48, 50,54, 58, 60, 68, 70, 78
Week 17

Readings: Review Chapter  11
Assignments:  Lab write-up for 10.2.
Prelab for 11.1
Pick an element that you feel is very important to life, our current world, or the future.  Make your thesis a statement that reflects why you feel that.  Support your statement in AT LEAST three other paragraphs (at least five total — intro, 3 body, 1 conclusion).  Include basic information about your element:  atomic number, atomic mass, location on table, oxidation states, family, discovery date (how and who, briefly), where it is found.  Include what current or future use of the element is or could be.  Back up your writing with a good bibliography.  NO WIKIPEDIA!  Use at least one actual book (these still exist).  BEFORE you start writing, present your idea to me for approval.
Week 18

Readings:  Review second half of Chapter 11 (Zumdahl)
Websites:
Assignments: Chapter 11 Problems:  1, 3, 4, 9, 14, 20, 22, 28, 38, 40, 41, 48, 56, 58, 62, 68
Pre-lab for 12.1
Post lab for 11.1 can WAIT.  It seems we need to explore some additional concepts before finishing it.  Leave room in your lab notebooks for the post lab, and we’ll return to it later.
Week 19

Readings: Zumdahl, Chapter 12
Websites:
Assignments: Post lab 12.1, 12.2
Chapter 11 Problems:  71, 72, 73, 77, 84, 86, 88, 110
Prelab:  12.3
Week 20

Readings: Review Zumdahl, Ch. 12

Websites:

Assignments:  Post lab 12.3,  Prelab 14.1

Chapter 12 problems: 7 (a,b), 9 (a,b), 11 (a,b), 14, 15, 22,24, 26, 29, 33, 36, 42, 44

Week 21

Readings: Read chapter 13, Zumdahl

Websites: Ideal Gas Law EquationIdeal Gas Law Example 1Ideal Gas Law Example 2Ideal Gas Law Example 3Ideal Gas Law Example 4Partial Pressure

Assignments: Prelab 14.2, Post lab 14.1

Chapter 12 Problems:  50, 54, 58, 62, 65, 68, 74, 75, 81, 83, 86, 90, 98, 100

Week 22

Readings:
Assignments:  Prelab for 14.3.
Zumdahl Problems, Ch. 13:  6, 9,12, 15, 18, 23, 26, 30, 33, 36, 40, 42 (don’t try this at home), 46, 49
IYC 365  — Over the next two months, you’ll create three entries for this contest.  Read through the rules and brainstorm your ideas.  Share those with me over the next week. Have FUN!
Week 23

Readings:  Zumdahl Chapter 14
Websites:
Assignments:  Postlab for 14.2 and 14.3  Please type labs so I can read them.
Prelab for 15.1
Zumdahl Problems, Chapter 14: 3, 5 ,6 ,9, 18, 21, 28, 38, 44, 50 (A,B)
Write your first entry for the International Year of Chemistry.  Pay attention the rules referred to in Week 22.
Week 24

Readings:  

Websites: Heat of Solution informationSolving problems video

Assignments:  Full typed lab report for 15.1

Make corrections to your first entry for IYC and submit to me for approval.  Once approved, we’ll submit.

Study for and take Chemistry Test 3.

Week 25

Readings:  Zumdahl, Chapter 15

Websites: Introduction to pH

Assignments:  Full prelab and postlab for 15.2  Read about lab 15.3 and do prelab.  Zumdahl problems Chapter 14:  58, 61, 63, 68, 74, 75, 77, 80, 84.  Present a topic to me for your second submission to  IYC 365

Week 26

Readings:  Re-read chapter 15 if needed.

Websites: Acid Base Introduction, Ph, POH of Strong Acids and Bases

Assignments:  Full lab report for 15.3.  Zumdahl problems Chapter 15:  2, 3, 5, 7, 15, 17, 21, 26, 27, 28, 31, 35    Research your topic for your second submission to IYC and begin writing.

Week 27

Readings:  Chapter 16

Websites:

Assignments:  Full lab report for 16.1.  Look at Lab 11.1 again and prepare for lab 11.2.  First draft for second IYC submission due.  Zumdahl problems Ch. 15: 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 55, 56,57, 63

Week 28

Readings:  Review chapter 16.

Websites:

Assignments:  Full Lab report for 11.2  FInal draft for 2nd IYC submission.  Zumdahl problems Ch. 16:  1, 4,5,7,9,11,13,17,20

Week 29

Readings:  Chapter 17, with a focus on the first half

Websites:  Reactions in Kinetics, La Chatelier’s Principle

Assignments:  The real final draft for 2nd IYC submission.  Full lab report for last lab.  Zumdahl problems Ch 16:  23, 27, 29, 32, 35, 41, 46, 51, 53, 54, 57, 64,67

Week 30

Readings: Review Chapter 17, with a focus on the second half.  Read intro to Ch 18 in your lab book and prepare for lab 18.1.

Websites:  Redox Reactions

Assignments:  Final draft of 2nd IYC should be sent to IYC.  Full lab report for 13.2   Zumdahl Ch 17: 7, 8, 15, 19, 29, 35, 37, 43, 46  Read the start of the lab chapter on colloids and suspensions.  We’ll do the first of those on Wed.

Week 31

Readings: Review Chapters 15, 16, 17 for test.

Websites: How a Car Battery Works,  How Batteries Work,  Electrolysis, Redox Demos

Assignments:  Find topic for 3rd IYC essay. Full lab report for 18.2.  We need a laser for 18.1 — I’m looking.  Zumdahl problems Ch 17:  33, 47, 49, 53, 56, 57, 61, 64  Start studying for the test.   We’ll review a bit this week.

Week 32

**Test 4 in class.  3rd IYC essay and lab report 18.1 due.  If we have time, we’ll do lab 18.3

Week 33

Readings:  Zumdahl, Chapter 18

Websites:  Cloud Chamber

Assignments:  Next draft of 3rd IYC essay.  Full lab report for 18.3.  Read information for lab 16.5.  Bring ideas for future labs to class.

Week 34

Readings: Organic Chemistry online chapter from CK12.

Websites:

Assignments:  Zumdahl Problems, Ch. 18:  13, 19, 21, 27, 28, 29, 33, 42, 44, 52, 54, 58, 68  Full lab report for galvanic cell lab.  Include what you think could have improved the outcome.

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48 thoughts on “HS Chemistry

  1. Sarah,

    Awesome resources!
    Love the links, detailed weekly chapter based resources…’I’ am excited to see the learning evolve with every passing week in your post :)) Thanks for putting it together and sharing it here…
    And have a ton of fun doing it with your son and buddy!!!

    Subadra

    • Hi, I was wondering if the Complete Solutions manual (which contains the even answers too) also has the answers to the “In Class Discussion” questions at the end of the Chapter or if I need the Instructor’s version for this. Thank you very much!

      • The Instructor’s Annotated Edition has answers for the self check exercises in the chapter and questions and problems at the end. It does not, for some odd reason, have the answers to the in-class discussion questions. The Solutions Manual has only the even answers WITH worked solutions for the chapter and problem sections at the end of each chapter. In short, I can’t find any source for the answers for ‘In Class Discussion,’ but there is so much other practice with solutions throughout the books, that I think you could comfortably skip those discussion questions if you weren’t comfortable finding the answers together.

  2. thanks for the links. We stared Chemistry last month, got sidetracked, did some Forensics, and will be getting back to Chemistry this month. Maybe in a week.

    I amusing the same course for all 3 of my boys- which will be a challenge for me. G(17)- LOVES Math, Physics, was doing beginner algebras at 5….. C(16)0- who is good at everything but has interest in NOTHING and…K, he’s the biggest challenge for using high school Chem. He’s 14 and seems to have not been programmed with any math desire and little ability & has ‘sensory meltdown’ esp when there are numbers involved. He just wants to be a pastor and go into acting.

  3. May I ask why you chose Zumdahl over Chang General Chemistry or any of the other chem textbooks that HSers use?

    Thank you for sharing your journey and plans with us!

    Sybil

    • My son liked the look of Zumdahl better. Textbook learning was not the best way into the brain of either boy, and the layout (font, etc) was more accessible in that book. Chang was our back-up, and to cover what Zumdahl did not.

  4. This is a very impressive plan! Since you apparently used Singapore science at other times, I was wondering if you’d considered Singapore’s Chemistry Matters and what you thought about it. I’ve been very impressed with what I’ve seen so far with Biology Matters and Chemistry Matters.

    • Thanks! I did consider it, but I’d become attached to Thompson’s “Illustrated Guide” for the labs and searched for a text to support it. I knew I could find almost everything required for the labs in that book so went with that direction. I’d love to read some “in the trenches” reviews of Singapore’s higher science (and higher math, for that matter). I’ve been hesitant to pursue them without detailed reviews.

  5. Hello. I am loving your Chemistry schedule…but…I am scared to tackle it with my son next year. I have found the textbook and a solutions manual, but I’m concerned my lack of knowledge in Chemistry will cause a problem. Do you have a background in Chemistry? Or, did you just figure it all out and go with it? I have a ps textbook and Apologia as well, but they are sorely lacking in the “experiment” area. I have looked at my copy of Robert Thompson’s lab book and tried to align it with my ps text, but I have failed miserably. Suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Robin

    • Hi, Robin! I had a semester of General Chemistry and a semester of Organic Chemistry in college, but my knowledge base does NOT rest in chemistry. Admittedly, I counted on that (distant) history and plowed ahead. I learned it again as I went along. Zumdahl is quite straightforward, which helped enormously. Having had chemistry in high school and college did help me in the lab skills department, but Thompson’s book contains enough information about how to do procedures that I think I’d have been fine without it.

      It’s fine if the lab for a subject comes a bit after the time the material is taught in the text. It’s also often fine if it comes a bit before, as the lab itself can illustrate a concept and make the reading about the material a bit easier. I didn’t try to map the whole year out from the start. Instead, I stayed a few weeks ahead (usually) so I could assure I had everything on hand when the lab came up. The titles of the lab will make more sense if you read through the text. Or, have your child work on the alignment. If your child is studying acids and bases in the text, it’s time for the lab on the same subject. My older son maintained our science supplies and was responsible for alerting me when we needed something. I ordered most everything at the start of the year, but he kept us on top of issues like depleted chemicals and broken glassware (it happens). It helped to be teaching two kids who were crazy about chemistry.

      It was a bit unnerving, but I enjoyed relearning while they were learning. I’d not do it without a solutions guide — worked answers — for whatever text you use. It’s simply not enough to have the answers. You need the path to how the answers were derived.

      Hope that helps ease the way a bit. Questions are welcome any time.

      Sarah

  6. Gosh! What a quick reply! Thanks so much!

    I only had high school Chemistry. My husband had several Chemistry courses…he’s a Mechanical Engineer. He typically stays out of my crazy homeschooling business, but he might just be recruited for this…at least for help lining things up. I actually tried to line up a few labs with the Holt textbook, but it was difficult…well, some were obvious, but others…well…I just have no idea.

    I am going to get the Zumdahl text and solutions manual. I looked at a sample on Amazon (a newer edition) and it looks easier to understand than the high school Holt text. It was certainly more engaging as far as writing style goes.

    My son loves blowing up things…he has used several how-to books on building explosive devices…I think he would really enjoy Mr. Thompson’s Chemistry lab book. We have tons of equipment already. I probably only need to order chemicals. Now I need a place to set up shop…

    Thanks again. Your site is great. I look at it often…reading and re-reading.

    Robin

    • When we built an addition, some six years ago, I specifically had a long desk/counter with cabinetry above and below for a lab bench. No, my request for a gas hook-up for the bunsen burner was not met, but I’ve managed.

      I’m glad you’re enjoying the site. I’ve enjoyed writing here and sharing what I’ve found. Thanks for the kind words.

      Sarah

  7. Good Morning! I have more questions for you! 1) Does your plan align the Zumdahl chapters with the labs in the Illustrated Guide? It appears that you had your students work through the books from beginning to end maybe not lining everything up? Did they just read the chemistry text and work from that and then cover the labs as an aside? Some of the labs/textbook chapters are obvious, but others…not so much, especially with my limited knowledge. And…2) Where did you order supplies? Mr. Thompson now has a chemistry “kit” that takes select labs from his book. The lab book is available free on his website. The “kit” is $168…it includes all chemicals and reuseable equipment. My problem is…I have almost ALL the equipment…I just need chemicals (I even have a few of those). Home Science Tools doesn’t carry many of the chemicals…where else can I go? I also priced just ordering chemicals and it was almost as much as just ordering his new “kit”. He recommends Chemistry: The Central Science as a text supplement…not so sure about that book…it’s huge. He also recommends the free text from CK12 online…Finally, he suggests doing the “kit” labs in order and picking and choosing from the text chapters rather than following the text and inserting labs. I don’t know about this…aren’t texts set up to be followed in a logical pattern? Or is each chapter able to be tackled independently of the others?

    Any thoughts on any of this? I know you are busy, but I’m in panic mode. I want to DO chemistry with my son…not just read about it (which is what my daughter did and it left her with no interest in chemistry). I don’t have tons of money to sink into this course…I can spread it out a bit and get a few things…oh…say each quarter or so…but not everything up front. I need a supplier that won’t want my firstborn as payment.

    Thanks for you all your help…
    Robin

    • Sorry for the delay in my reply. We’ve been traveling.

      For the most part, the labs match the book, although there are exceptions. I’ve noted the order in both in my syllabus. Generally, the labs went with the material, although at points they were a bit behind or ahead, which is not unusual in a lab course.

      I ordered most of our supplies from Home Science Tools and a few from United Nuclear. We omitted labs when costs were prohibitive, although we started with a fairly extensive supply of lab materials, so there was less to buy. United Nuclear should fill in the gaps.

      I have no idea about Chemistry: The Central Science, and while the CK12 materials look okay, they just don’t hold the visual appeal of a full-color text. Whatever you choose, I’d follow the order of the text, since jumping can be a problem and different texts order things different ways. When we needed a concept for a lab (and just couldn’t wait for the chapter to come up), I’d teach the core of the topic then return to it later in the text. You will not find a perfect pairing, unless the text and lab book were made to go together, and adjusting and compensating is to be expected.

      Breathe in and out. You can do this. Pick the labs that are within your budget. We didn’t purchase everything at once for exactly the reason you’re describing. If you hit a snag or question, email me, and I’ll do my best to help.

      Sarah

  8. Sarah…thanks for the response. That’s really all I needed to know. I know labs and lectures in college don’t always line up (as my daughter has told me on many occasions and much to her irritation!). Anyway, I have the Zumdahl text, which I think looks great and is very engaging. That Chemistry: The Central Science is a behemoth…bleh…I think we will follow your syllabus best we can, doing what we can. Thanks again. You’ve been a huge help. Robin 🙂

  9. Hi…it’s me again! I have another question for you…

    How did you come up with tests? As I confessed before, I have little chemistry knowledge. For “textbook” learning in past years, I have used the chapter end assessments as tests. In some cases, even open-book.

    If you have any suggestions, I’d appreciate it.

    Thanks AGAIN! Robin

    • Good question. I used questions from Zumdahl that I hadn’t asked them to answer for homework, took some from a Chang Chemistry book and Study Guide that I’d picked up in my search for a primary text for the class, and some from my own head (essay questions, not problems). While for biology, I wrote most of my own questions, for chemistry, I generally picked and chose from other sources. Books were closed, although I did provide them with ion charts for one test and periodic tables for all tests.

  10. Thanks Sarah. I’ve ordered two texts (one for my son and one for me) and a solutions guide. We already have the lab book. I”m making a list of chemiicals to order for the first quarter based on your syllabus. I was hesitant to go this route, but after looking over other pre-made programs and reviews for them, I was left unimpressed. I had considered Oak Meadow, but even their stuff got blah reviews…especially the textbook…typical high school text that doesn’t explain well.

    You have been great…and patient! Thanks again and I think the rest is up to me now…even if I don’t have a clue! It will be like math…learn along with him!

    • That’s the last page of lectures. At the bottom of the site, you’ll see a link to archived assignments. Click there, go down, and you’ll find the earlier lessons.

  11. What a great resource – thank you for posting.
    I was curious about the “This we know” link referenced in Weeks 6 and 14.

    Thanks,
    Mo

  12. Thank you for this! May I ask why you decided to use the Illustrated Guide for experiments instead of the Lab book which matches the Zumdahl text?

    Thanks,
    Michele

  13. Sold! I really don’t have the patience to wade through lab texts meant for teachers and classroom use. (One lab book had listed in the materials for students to use *blue-green chemical* – somehow that is not helpful to me!) Thanks for taking the time to answer my question.

  14. It seems that I read somewhere that the teacher’s edition that you had was for Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation. If so, can you tell me how much of a difference there was between Introductory Chemistry and Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation? I can NOT for the life of me even find an ISBN # for the teacher’s edition for the other. Ugh!

    Thanks

    • A friend of mine had the Foundation edition TE (ISBN 0618305076. Corresponding Foundation text is ISBN 0618304991), which is actually a few chapters longer than the Introductory version. To do again, I’d want the Foundation edition of the text for the kids as well. The additional chapters are biochemistry and organic chemistry, which we brushed over the last week using the CK12 book. Keep in mind the text book does have the even answers, although not the solutions. There are solutions guides (ISBN 9780618305308 worked for us) which have the full worked answers. Summary: Foundation has 20 chapter. Basic has 15 chapters. The one called Introductory Chemistry has 18. The solution ISBN above works for all three books, and the ONLY difference between those three versions is the number of chapters. Clear as mud? Let me know if you need more info.

      • Thank you. That was kind of what I thought was the case, but I wanted to verify before making anymore purchases. I’ve already bought the solutions guide, (twice actually—I thought the one order had been canceled), but now I think that the teacher’s manual would better serve my purposes.

  15. So, I was looking for a copy of the TM and I thought I had finally found what I needed, but I just noticed that what I ordered was the 1993 edition. Any idea how different this is going to be content wise?

    • I have no idea on that issue. There may be plenty of similarity, since entire chapters of questions don’t usually get rewritten. Just be cautious as you assign and as you grade that you’re assigning what you have the answers for and that you’re checking their answers with the correct corresponding answers! It might be a bit more work, but I bet it is fine.

      • So, the older annotated edition only has answers to, you guessed it, the even numbered problems.

  16. Thank you so much for this excellent resource. I’m homeschooling a 2E middle schooler who used to be absolutely passionate about science before he went to Public school for the last two years. My background is in literature so I’ll take help where I can find it as we try to rekindle his love for the subject!
    Question for you : would you recommend going with a newer edition of the Zumdahl? Do you know if there is anything in the newer texts (besides the updated Periodic table) that this edition of the text might be missing? I can’t imagine that Chemistry has changed that much but I am a little leery since the text is a few years old.

    • You’re welcome! Chemistry at this level is stable, so I’ve not looked for a newer edition and likely will use this one when I teach the class to my younger and a friend next school year. All should be good!

  17. Thanks for sharing your hard work in creating a syllabus with supplements. I have a question if you don’t mind though. Does the solution manual contain answers to ALL the problems? Or just the solutions to the even ones which have the answers (not the solutions) in the book? Thanks in advance for your help. I’m trying to put together Chemistry for my engineering bent daughter for the fall.

    • Sorry but second question. I found the study guide and assume it has problems in it as well as the solutions. But, when you assigned odd problems, how did you know for sure your answer was correct? I’m loving your syllabus and lab book choice so I think I’ve finally found an answer to my stress, but I’m not sure about the odd problems. Thank you in advance!

      • The study guide has all the answers to the problems in the study guide, so that’s no problem. The solution manual AND the TE of the text have worked answers to to the problems in the text. You
        are covered on every front.

  18. Hi Sarah –

    I am so grateful for this resource! My daughter is tackling chemistry this year, and having your syllabus with its video links has been so helpful.

    I am wondering if you post the links to the tests. I’ve searched here on your blog as well as on “Let’s Not Burn Down the House,” but can’t find them. If not, can you recommend how to create one on my own? It’s been quite a while since I was in AP Chem…

    Thanks so much!

    Carla

    • I’m writing the first test for this year now. I’ve never created answer sheets for them, primarily because I usually have a mix of questions I created and those that come from various books. Yes, I know that creates a problem for those using the curriculum, but time is short. When the test is ready, I’ll link to the test (on Google Drive), and I’ll try to address the issue of answers. I would like to create an answer guide this year, as I go, at least addressing the problems.

  19. Thank you so much for this invaluable resource! Can you share with us titles of books you either used or considered using for the “living books” component? I have a few in mind, but would love to know what you used.

  20. Thank you for sharing your homeschool journey with us. I’m interested in using your chemistry syllabus, but I was having trouble finding the links to the tests. (I also checked “Let’s not burn down the house.”) If it’s not too much trouble, can you send me the tests and solutions (if you have them)?

    • The links should be on the Chemistry website itself. The solutions are not, and I know that decreases the value of the tests, but I’ve just not gotten around to creating those.

      • You’ve done so much already, I hate to bother you, but I am unable to find the links to the tests. Could you help? (We plan to follow this next year!)

      • The links should be on the “Let’s Not Burn Down the House” site. The answers are not, as I never managed to load them all in. The problems are from the book.

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